Massage for Gay and Bi Men

Toy Material

When I started buying my first sex toys, I was a bit naive. My budget was limited and the look and shape were more important to me than the composition of the material. I had no idea that I could endanger my health.
Unfortunately, the sex toy industry is not regulated. That means that absolutely everything can be put into your “sex toy”. Sometimes you see the label on the packaging that says “For external use only”. This basically means that if you hurt yourself or develop a disease through use, the manufacturer cannot be held responsible.
It is very expensive to “certify” a toy, so most companies simply do not bother.
When buying a toy, you should usually use products made of medical silicone, ABS plastic, glass, or metal to make sure that no harmful substances are allowed to enter your body. Especially the mucous membranes of the penis and anus are sensitive and quickly absorb harmful substances.

Rubber Jelly PVC

Sex toys made of rubber, jelly, PVC are still sold because they are cheaper to make and incredibly flexible. However, they contain harmful chemicals and are only “body-safe” with a condom. They become porous after a while and get microscopic “holes” in the material, in which bacteria can multiply if it is not thoroughly antibacterially cleaned. If they are not stored separately, they react with each other and become unusable (melt).

Pro:
– cheap (but you may pay with your health)
– soft and flexible (there are alternatives)
– only body-safe with condom

Con:
– quickly becomes porous (susceptible to bacteria)
– smells strong (chemical cocktail)
– contains phthalates (harmful to health)
– becomes bad in combination with oil
– use (if at all) only with water-based lubricants

Thermoplastic Elastomer (TPE)

TPE is a mixture of natural or synthetic rubber and various oils and has the same skin-friendly properties as silicone, but is more elastic and similar to the skin. It is therefore often used in masturbators for men.

Pro:
do not contain (usually) PVC, latex or phthalates
– soft and flexible
– body safe with a condom
– Use in masturbators harmless

Con:
– quickly becomes porous (susceptible to bacteria)
– Use in the anal area (without condom) hazardous to health
– storage with talcum/corn powder recommended
– antibacterial cleaning necessary
– use only with water-based lubricants

Medical silicone

Medical silicone is one of the safest materials used in the manufacture of sex toys. Silicone can be very expensive to produce. Good quality has its price. Silicone comes in different textures and can be extremely strong or super soft. It warms up extremely easily to body temperature and is perfect for use in dildos and butt plugs, as it is much more comfortable to insert due to its light “squeezing”.
Don’t let yourself be confused by silicone mixtures like “sil-a-gel”. These toys are still porous and may not be 100% body-safe.

Pro:
– smooth and soft
– very slippery
– kind to the skin
– non-porous / bacteria cannot attach themselves
– easy to clean (under hot water)
– platinum-crosslinked silicone is absolutely physically safe

Con:
– much more expensive
– lubricating gels on silicone and oil base attack silicone
– use only with water-based lubricants
– attracts dust like a magnet (dust-free storage necessary)

Glass

Glass toys are my absolute favorite material for sex toys at the moment. Glass toys (mostly dildos) are made of borosilicate glass (the same material from which Pyrex dishes are made in the kitchen). Glass toys can be warmed to body temperature, which feels incredibly pleasant.

Pro:
– non-porous and body-safe and hypoallergenic
– easy to clean (even in the dishwasher)
– fracture stable
– can be used with any lubricant/oil
– glass can be heated and maintain the temperature

Con:
– slightly more expensive than TPE/rubber
– not flexible/to be used with caution (especially in the anal area)

Metal

In Germany, metal toys made of stainless steel must be made of 100% surgical steel and be nickel-free. This not only makes them particularly hygienic but also skin-friendly and virtually allergy-free!

Pro:
– non-porous, safe and hypoallergenic (if nickel-free)
– easy to clean
– can be used with any lubricant/oil
– can be heated like glass and maintain the temperature

Con:
– it needs some experience in handling
– not to be used flexibly and with caution (especially in the anal area)

The corresponding weight and the possibility to warm them up in advance makes it interesting for some users. When heating them, as with glass, care must be taken not to set the temperature too high and not to injure yourself.